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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
. [laughter] i didn't ask them to ask this question. >> his name is lee -- >> lee edwards. >> lee edwards. >> that's right. >> who is also a biographer, as you are. >> and he's a historian. he's written several histories of the conservative movement. he himself has been a member of the conservative movement, an important person in that. >> jealousy? >> no, it's not jealousy, i can do that. but one thing about mr. edwards being asked to write that review, is that one of the things he takes issue with is i call him from his ghost writer because -- it was thurmond's staffer, former staffer of thurmond who has characterized his work on the book as being ghost writing. i talked to them and after talking to him, i e-mailed mr. edwards and i asked him if i could interview him about his relationship with traffic and what work he did in that kind of thing. and he said it was 40 years ago, yeah, as any entity would be a waste of your time and mine. so my own thing i can do, he was brave enough to read a criticism after the book when it got right. he got a number of things wrong. he quoted goldwater
, all the way back to 1990. mickey edwards was still in congress then. an eight-term representative from oklahoma, and a formidable leader among conservatives who nonetheless knew how to work with opponents to get things done. he chaired the republican policy committee, was a founding trustee of the conservative heritage foundation, and served as national chairman of the american conservative union. after redistricting by democrats cost him his seat in 1993, he taught at harvard and princeton, became vice president of the aspen institute, and wrote this book: "reclaiming conservatism: how a great american political movement got lost--and how it can find its way back." now he's out with another book, one calling for real, even radical, change: "the parties versus the people: how to turn republicans and democrats into americans." mickey edwards, welcome. >> thanks, bill. it's good to see you again. >> and congratulations on the book, although i can't imagine it's made you the most popular visitor to the house republican caucus. >> not at all. but it wouldn't make me popular in the democrat
of all three of them. and, of course, marvin kalb, who is the edward r. murrow professor emeritus at the harvard school of government and to contribute news analyst for npr and fox news channel, and is frequently called upon to comment on major issues of the day by many other leading organizations, and also he is very dear to her heart here at afsa. history to serve as moderator and has done a superb job every time. very happy to have you back, marvin. thank you so much. let me just go back and say just a word about the in depth knowledge, the skill, the dedication and perseverance of each of you present today, who worked on the negotiating team for the process that led up to it. really did not just bring this to tuition -- fruition. it required outstanding diplomacy and capacity to balance the risks and demand of piece and the sort of okay security environment of the cold war period, which perhaps most people to remember, but perhaps some do not. so before turning the program over to marvin though, i would just like to mention, we have a new book that is very pertinent to the sub
and seeing that it is actually edward scissor hands leaning over you in a mask and scrubs ready for thorpgs on which your life depends. joining us now is jared bernstein, a senior fellow at the center on budget and policy priorities. former economic policy adviser to vice president joe biden. and he's an msnbc and cnbc contributor. jared, it is always a pleasure to have you here. thank you. >> my pleasure. >> let me ask your opinion as somebody with a background in economics that you have about how big a deal it would be if we don't do anything. i refuse to use the word "cliff" on this show. so please try to avoid using that. because i won't say it out loud even if i'll put it in a graphic. but how big a deal do you think this would be? how much pain are we talking about risking here? >> if we went over the thing and stayed over, it would be a very big deal. the numbers that the cbo predicts -- i've been watching this kind of thing for a long time. i don't recall the cbo ever predicting that policy x would lead to recession y. but they did in this case because it's such a huge fiscal contra
to the gentlelady from maryland, ms. edwards. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. edwards: thank you, mr. speaker. and i thank the gentleman from connecticut, both for your leadership and i share in your absolute sorrow. and to honor the memory of the 20 children and six educators who lost their lives in this really horrific attack at sandy hook elementary school in newtown, connecticut. my thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families and our first responders and all of those both in newtown and across this country who are affected by this tragedy. first as a mother my heart truly aches for the parents who lost their children, young and old. lost their future. but as a member of congress, i also know that we're not doing nearly enough to protect our children and to protect our communities from gun violence. in cities and rural areas, schools, offices and homes, this has happened far too many times in far too many communities all across our country. in my district alone, there have been over 160 incidences of gun violence in -- this year. and 46 people in my
from "60 minutes" on the project along with actors matt damon don cheadle and edward norton. it will be on tv next year. >> bill: al gore involved with this? >> i do not believe so. >> he should be. >> bill: he should be. >> president obama welcomed members of congress to the white house for a christmas party last night. interesting to note this is the fourth straight year where they've taken time out for holiday cheer while being on a strict deadline on huge legislation. the fiscal cliff likely wade for awkward conversations around the eggnog last night. >> bill: i'm sure when john boehner had his picture taken with the president. >> oh, yeah. >> bill: how are we doing here john? >> rick santorum has a new job. the former senator and failed presidential candidate will write a weekly column for the conservative world net daily site. ceo joseph made the announcement yesterday saying santorum will continue to go to bat for conservatives who feel their voices aren't being heard. >> bill: i cannot criticize r
as an important person. and that is edward meese. he was first an adviser and attorney general. he said there has been a liberal agenda. above all, roe versus wade banned abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution. there was a lawyer who wanted work on behalf of that agenda. john roberts and samuel alito. 1985 in a memo. justice alito wrote what can be made of this opportunity to advance and bring about the eventual overruling of roe versus wade. later that year, apply for a promotion he wrote i'm particularly proud of my contribution. .. so reagan's people went all the way to the intermediate appeals court in arizona. not even the arizona supreme court to find a remarkable figure who buys and a sandra day o'connor. sandra day o'connor is not a social conservative for a religious conservative or anything like the kind of conservatives that dominate the republican party now and that was fine with ronald reagan. he didn't care. it wasn't his agenda either and he's very proud of this nomination of o'connor. 1996, chief justice burger stepped down. reagan elevated rehnquist as chief justice, named
candidate, at one point, from hillary clinton to barack obama, from john kerry to john edwards, all of them, they all played for their plan with this simple phrase, "rolling back the bush tax cuts." they've been doing it for eight years. so politically, that's why the president has to draw that line in the sand. >> he draws that line in the sand, but harold ford, what happens when republicans, at least a small number of them, go ahead and raise taxes on the top 2% and then turn to the white house and say, okay. now we'll move. and then they have to talk about how they're going to slash spending in medicare, to save medicare, how they'll have to slash spending in medicaid to save medicaid. their political problem on the other side of this tax debate is so much bigger than the republican problem. they're being too clever by half here. >> both sides have complicated hands. and if the democrats, we achieve what the president and some democrats in the senate are asking for in a narrow way around taxes, you're absolutely right. just as an aside on the bush era, this is the first time we didn't go
mention george schultz and edward chef national guard in addition si. neither of them could have done it without that support. -- shevardnadze. by the united states needed the confidence of somebody with the right swing -- wing that would be defensible. most of the democrats probably thought it was a good idea and they supported us every way as we were going toward the soviet union. >> not so much on deployment, jack. remember the nuclear freeze moment? >> i mean when we got the treaties. i would also say in the case of the soviets none of gorbachev's successors would have been capable of doing what he did to kaeu change soviet policy to understand the degree to which the predecessors' policies were not in their interest. to do t took gorbachev what is virtually impossible that is to change the institutions in your country. he ran great risks and ultimately he wasn't successful. but he was successful in most of the things that made a real difference to us. without the two of them i don't know how this was going to happen. >> do you share that view, without the two? >> i do. i happe
you a brief recap of all three of them. and, of course, marvin kalb, who is the edward r. murrow professor emeritus at harvard kennedy school of government. and a contributing news analyst for npr and fox news channel. antaeus wrigley called upon to comment on major issues of the day by many other leading news organizations. and also he is very dear to our heart here at aspen because he is legally serve as moderator, and done a superb job each time. very happy to have you back, martin. thank you so much. let me just go back and say just a word about the in depth knowledge, skill, dedication and perseverance of each of you present today who worked on the negotiating team for the process that led up to it. really did not just bring this to fruition but also reflect the practice of diplomacy at its best. it required outstanding diplomacy and -- to balance the risks and demands of peace in the sort of opec security environment of the cold war period, which perhaps, perhaps most people to remember but perhaps some do not. so, before turning the program over to marvin though, i would j
can have the opposite effect. nobel economist edward press scott of arizona has found that higher marginal tax rates are the reason europeans work one-third fewer hours than americans. when marginal rates are lower, prosperity flows to other sectors of society, allowing business to create jobs and new products, compete for workers to raise wages and i vest their profits, which can then be lent to other entrepreneurs. everyone gains in a free economy. as john f. kennedy put it, a rising tide lifts all boats. look at what free enpricent pris achieved? millions of new private-sector jobs were created and the stock market soared tripling in value over eight years. the lower tax rates and reduced regulatory burden produce add more robust economy and a more robust economy meant more revenue for government. similar resulted attended the tax rate reductions during the presidency of george w. bush. many policy-makers have forgotten these lessons. in 2008, america's score in the index of economic freedom has declined significantly -- i mean, since 2008, to the point where we are no longer c
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)

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